KUMEYAAY ON THE COAST

Sept. 17, 2015 the OB Historical Society presented: KUMEYAAY ON THE COAST- OVERLOOKED ASPECTS OF NATIVE FISHING AND MARITIME, by Professor Richard Carrico. The San Diego region has always been a mecca for those who want to fish and to enjoy the rich bounty of our bays and ocean. When guest lecturer Professor Richard Carrico says always, he means always—as in for thousands of years.
The Kumeyaay people of San Diego County are often portrayed as people who relied on acorns, deer, and rabbits as their primary food sources. While these foods were important, the Kumeyaay were also masters of the bays and oceans—they were maritime peoples thousands of years before arrival of the Spaniards.
Mr. Carrico has been researching the role of the ocean and bays in Kumeyaay culture, including the Ocean Beach area, for more than thirty years. Relying on archaeological, anthropological, and historical data, Carrico will peel back more than 3,000 years of history to provide an image of the Kumeyaay that has been largely ignored.
This discussion focused on the techniques and methods used by the Kumeyaay to procure a large variety of fish, shellfish, and other maritime food sources. Topics ranged from the types of boats and canoes used by the Kumeyaay, the importance of the oceans and bays in Kumeyaay oral tradition, the various locales exploited by the Kumeyaay including the deep ocean, the off shore islands, and San Diego and Mission Bays. Mr. Carrico also placed Kumeyaay fishing and maritime activities within the context of their overall cosmology including the many native maritime place names. His knowledge and humor were well received.

Sept. 10 – History of Balboa Park’s Botanical Building

Sept. 10 at 3:30pm at the Point Loma Assembly, 3035 Talbot St, San Diego, CA 92106 – History of Balboa Park’s Botanical Building with Vonn Marie May (former OB Resident)
Landscape historian and cultural landscape specialist Vonn Marie May will speak about the History of Balboa Park’s Botanical Building.
All land has a history. A ‘deep read’ of the cultural landscape will reveal its origins and intents. Those precedents, or findings, can inform and cue the future. A cultural landscape investigation conducted during land use planning will provide a richer understanding of the past, an account of the present, and more culturally grounded future.– Vonn Marie May
Vonn Marie is a landscape historian and cultural landscape specialist with over 20 years of project experience. Her advocacy and rigor reflects her historic preservation and legal research background. Embracing the use of historic values in planning and design she has authored several successful National Register nominations, which include historical landscapes and settings.
Vonn Marie May, Cultural Landscape Consultant